The future of computing through fractal geometry.

Fractal geometry, to put it simply, is the fourth dimension, it is supplementary to the first three or “euclidian” dimensions, length, width, and height, and it describes the space in between the first three dimensions. For example, a euclidian definition of a mountain would be a cone, as that can easily be translated from its length, width, and height, whereas a “fractallian” definition would describe it based on its components. This is done as pertaining to the three principles of fractals: self-similarity, recursiveness, and initiation, which state respectively, that each component of a fractal is similar to the whole fractal, and that the self-similarity is infinite in detail, going on forever. So how do I go from writing about iPads and the future of computing to this, I have to state that such a jump is not that far of one. You see, in my mind, fractals hold the key to the future of computing. A key element of fractals is their property of infinite detail in a limited amount of space, an element that could be translated into computing quite clearly. The use of standardized data utilizing minuscule variations to such data could allow for self similar binary (1s and 0s for the non tech savvy) that could be infinite in detail while still being finite in the amount of space it takes up. This would allow for infinite storage and memory, which would simultaneously expedite the convergence of memory and storage, and null another limitation to compute power. However this concept fringes on the translation of Mandelbrot’s formula (Z [the complete fractal, think the complete triangle from pascals triangle]= Z * C^2 [The little triangles multiplied by their amount]) to binary, which would be done in a similar way into its translation into color, where an integer for Z translates to a specified color as it inches towards infinity and a rational number with a decimal translates to black as it inches towards zero. Once this could be translated, a major barrier in computing could be broken, and major technological leaps could be made.

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